I was accepted to the Icelandic Textile Centre as a resident for the month of July. Having based my degree work around ideas concerning cartography and culture, I was excited to travel and experience a new culture and landscape. Situated between two tectonic plates on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has such an extreme and unusual landscape.   

Bubbling mud pots in Myvatn

Bubbling mud pots in Myvatn

Lupine petals ready to become a yellow dye

Lupine petals ready to become a yellow dye

Walking through the Lupine flowers to get to a rhubarb plant

Walking through the Lupine flowers to get to a rhubarb plant

I began my residency by dying fabrics and yarns with local flora and lichen. The oranges and yellows I achieved echoed the colours of the desolate land in the Myvatn area. 

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Natural dyes on silk organza

Natural dyes on silk organza

I experimented hand weaving with different fibres and colours. Finally I moved to a floor loom and developed a concept for a piece. For the time I was Iceland there was constant brightness. An Icelandic lady referred to the summer as her favourite day. This resonated with me, my experience began to feel like one long day, as darkness never came to allow us differentiate the night from the day. I decided to record the official day lengths through weave using naturally dyed yarn. 

This piece records the 31 days of July. It reads from top to bottom with each weft yarn representing the numbers of hours and then minutes in the day. 

The colours in my final piece is are all derived from rhubarb root which gave me dramatically different colours with cotton than it did with wool.

Balllyroan Library, Dublin

Balllyroan Library, Dublin